11 Popular Non-Alcoholic Jamaican Drinks To Try

When we think of non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks, our taste buds often conjure up images of bold and vibrant flavors, tropical fruits, and refreshing concoctions. While Jamaica is famous for its rum-based cocktails, the island also offers a wide array of non-alcoholic drinks that capture the essence of its culture and natural bounty. 

Whether you’re seeking a thirst quencher on a hot summer day or exploring the rich culinary heritage of Jamaica, these 11 popular non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks are a must-try for anyone looking to savor the flavors of the Caribbean.

Jamaican Java: Blue Mountain Coffee

A short introduction to Blue Mountain Coffee by Old City Coffee Philadelphia

If you prefer non-alcoholic beverages, Jamaica offers a variety, including Blue Mountain Coffee. This genuine mix has a reputation for being one of the world’s best and most expensive coffee brands. It also accounts for only 0.1% of global coffee production.

Blue Mountain Coffee is grown in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica’s longest mountain range and one of the Caribbean’s highest peaks at 7,402 feet (2,256 meters). The altitude is claimed to contribute to the richness of this coffee, which is chosen and roasted as part of a lengthy process.

Jamaicans take a hands-on approach when it comes to producing, selecting, and processing coffee. As a result of this process, there is less production and a more expensive export. In addition, Jamaica produces very little coffee, only growing between 4 and 5 million pounds each year.

Meanwhile, Greater Caribbean regions produce between 13 million and 118 million pounds per year. Their growing season, high in the Blue Mountains, likewise takes longer to produce a crop, lasting up to 10 months from bloom to harvest. This, in turn, hinders the creation of this fantastic Jamaican beverage. 

It is also fairly laborious. Even after they are picked, they are graded and separated by quality, so as you can see, the process of making this delicious and famous Jamaican drink, Blue Mountain Coffee, takes quite some time.

Blue Mountain coffee is a terrific choice for a fantastic souvenir for your Jamaican trip. Its fruits have a floral scent and a creamy richness balanced by lively acidity. Another outstanding characteristic of Blue Mountain coffee is its utter lack of bitterness. A delicious cup of creamy coffee is the perfect way to start the day!

Coconut Water

On a sunny island like Jamaica, coconut water is a refreshing treat. On this island, you may enjoy the crispness and sweetness of this delectable treat in its purest form – fresh from a coconut! 

Many Jamaican beaches have people chopping the tops of young coconuts with a machete and serving it with a straw. The water from these coconuts is pleasant, and you may even request that your coconut shell be entirely broken open so you can taste the ‘coconut jelly.’

If you want to drink coconut water while visiting Jamaica’s beaches, search for merchants wandering the dunes selling these goods. If you don’t get a young, fresh, green coconut, you won’t get much water. Note: Mid-December to April is the perfect time to visit Jamaica to drink coconut water on the beach.

Jamaican Ginger Beer

Jamaican Ginger Beer recipe by Cook Like A Jamaican

Ginger beer is a worldwide favorite. In addition to its signature sweetness, this drink’s popularity stems from its potential medical benefits, which include preventing morning sickness. 

Jamaican ginger beer is widely regarded as the best in the world. This honor may be due to the fact that the ginger beer produced on this island employs sugar cane rather than sugar syrup, which gives it a distinct flavor. Aside from sugar cane, additional components used to make ginger beer include honey, sugar, and lime juice. 

While the name implies beer, this is a soft drink. It is a delicious and fragrant spice-infused beverage that the children can drink to their hearts’ content. Ginger beer has numerous health benefits, including gastrointestinal relief and improved heart health. 

This fermented beverage initially appeared in England in the mid-nineteenth century. Back then, it was much more alcoholic. When Jamaica became a British colony, ginger beer spread and became a staple of the island’s drink menu.

The alcohol content of the Jamaican version, like in other nations, was later reduced. However, it is not uncommon for locals to add rum to the drink to give it a more robust flavor. As a result, before purchasing the drink for your children, you should carefully ask about the ingredients.

Malta

Malta is highly addictive, and if you’ve never tried it, Jamaica would be an excellent location to start. This well-known, softly carbonated malt beverage contains the same elements as beer, such as barley, hops, and water. It even smells and appears to be beer.

But it’s not beer or booze. Malta resembles a dark stout and is non-alcoholic. This beverage is sometimes referred to as an unfermented beer. 

This beverage has a thick molasses sweetness to it. It can be consumed directly from the can, preferably chilled or over ice. Malta is easy to find in Jamaica; look for it in supermarkets, cafés, resorts, or drink booths. 

Ironically, it is said to have originated in Germany, the world’s beer superpower, and reached its modern shape in the 1960s. Today, Malta, coupled with condensed milk, is a popular combination in many countries, including Jamaica.

Jamaican Peanut Punch

peanut punch recipe

Peanut Punch Recipe

Peanut Punch is a Jamaican drink that is created with peanut protein powder (or Supligen), cream, milk, and spices. This Peanut Punch is a favorite of athletes and anyone else looking for a protein boost or even to drink something sweet and substantial. Peanut punch is creamy and sweet and easy to find in Jamaica – most street sellers sell it in bags or plastic cups. It's traditionally made with Guinness so if you're planning a party, add Guinness 0.0.
Total Time 10 minutes
Course Drinks

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 1/4 cup dry oats
  • 3/4 cup peanuts
  • 2 cup Supligen
  • 1/2 cup condensed milk (Don't substitute. This is what makes Peanut Punch amazing)
  • 1 tsp non-alcoholic vanilla extract (find it at Trader Joe's)
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 6 ounces optional Guiness 0.0

Instructions
 

  • Add all the ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.
  • Strain into a bowl and chill overnight. You can strain into anything with a large opening and then transfer to a cup.
  • Enjoy cold.
  • Garnish with a mint leaf if serving at a party.
Keyword Jamaican Peanut Punch, Peanut Punch, Peanut Punch Recipe

Here’s how to make a non-alcoholic Jamaican Peanut Punch by Chef Ricardo Cooking:

Ting

Ting is one of Jamaica’s most popular soft beverages. This is a flexible mixed drink that was founded in 1976. Its secret to popularity is its bittersweet Jamaican grapefruit juice, which gives the drink an addicting and refreshing feel. 

Ting is a common sight in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries. Consider it the region’s Coca-Cola, or, more specifically, a more diverse Coca-Cola. In the Jamaican heat, this drink can be rather refreshing. Ting is best served chilled, and you can add some ice to cool off even more.

Soursop Juice

As a tropical country, Jamaica has an abundance of tasty, vitamin-packed fruits that will make your mouth wet. Soursop is one such example.

Soursop juice, contrary to its name, is not at all sour. This drink is sweeter, with hints of pineapple, strawberry, and even citrus. This vitamin-rich beverage is one of the healthiest choices you can make while in Jamaica, and the best part is that it’s easy to find. 

Soursop juice is created by mixing the fruit, which results in a rich, creamy drink. Some individuals add lime to their soursop juice, which can be an interesting flavor combination. Another alternative is to sweeten the juice with condensed milk and a dash of vanilla and nutmeg.

Bag Juice

Bag juice is a traditional Jamaican dessert. You will be fascinated by these small, colorful bags as you wander through the busy streets of this island, and if you are, you should at least try them once. 

Bag juice is often made out of water and fruity syrup; locals can point you to where to buy it. Bag juice is often marketed as iced, which adds to its allure as a thirst quencher in the Jamaican heat. It is also reasonably priced and available in various colors and flavors. 

It’s unclear when this drink first appeared, but it has delighted many generations of Jamaican youngsters since then. All you have to do is bite a corner of the plastic and sip!

Sorrel Tea

Making sorrel tea with Rozy’s Kitchen

White tea, black tea, and green tea are the common refreshing drinks that everyone knows. But take a look at the fascinating magenta beauty of sorrel tea, a tasty drink that Jamaica’s rich greenery is delighted to give! The beverage is also popular throughout Africa and areas of Latin America.

The hibiscus flower has no odor when it is fresh. However, its essence produces a very lemony, acidic drink and thirst-quenching. “Sorrel” comes from an Old French word, “sour.” 

Sorrel tea is produced from dried hibiscus flower buds. The color of these blossoms is magenta/purple. Other countries have distinct recipes, but Jamaicans use sugar, ginger, spices, and lime soda. With a few ice cubes, the tea can help you beat the tropical heat.

This is often served cold, with some versions adding a small amount of carbonated water and lime. Sorrel has several health benefits, which you may gain by sipping some sorrel tea in Jamaica.  

Although most people in the Caribbean connect sorrel with Christmas, it is available all year in Jamaica. It is traditionally served warm and spiced with ginger, cinnamon, and allspice during Christmas.

Bush Tea

The Caribbean folks and their bush tea – it is truly regarded as a comfort drink and a cure-all. Jamaican bush tea, made from native plants, is caffeine-free, packed with health advantages, and potent enough to provide fantastic alcohol-free concoctions.

In Jamaica, there are five main forms of bush tea: peppermint, fever grass (or lemongrass), dandelion, strawberry-like soursop leaf, and extremely bitter cerasee. The latter two are especially associated with the Caribbean region and Jamaica, in particular. Each form of bush tea has its advantages. 

Soursop leaf tea, for example, can help with sleeplessness, while cerasee can help with stomach distress. To avoid undesired side effects, don’t drink too much bush tea over a long period of time, like with other medicinal herbs.

While in Jamaica, you can join botanical garden tours to learn about the varied applications and therapeutic advantages of the numerous plants on the island. This knowledge is sacred and is passed down through generations.

Irish Moss

Is it possible to drink moss? In Jamaica, the answer is yes. Irish moss is a superfood that is harvested from the sea. 

Sometimes known as sea moss, it is high in omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins, and minerals. In terms of health advantages, this sea moss is supposed to reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and the risk of heart disease.

Irish moss takes its name from the Irish people’s long history of preparing algae for food and beverage. However, in Jamaica, the moss is a native plant that grows abundantly along rocky areas. As a result, using moss to make this drink is only natural.

Making Irish moss is a time-consuming and labor-intensive procedure. The moss is first washed and soaked overnight. The pulp is then blended into a thick gel. Typically, almond milk, vanilla, spices, and maple syrup are added at this step. The mixture is mixed until smooth. 

If you don’t have the time to prepare this or are afraid to try it, you can buy Irish moss in restaurants, cafés, and roadside drink stands. Irish moss has a rich, sweet, and slightly salty flavor with a creamy texture. It can be alcoholic or non-alcoholic, depending on your preferences. It will be much more wonderful if it contains carrageenan (seaweed extract).

Try making your own Irish Moss at home using this step-by-step demo from Jerene’s Eats as a guide!

How to make Irish Moss by Jerene’s Eats

Experience Jamaican Drinks in a Non-Alcoholic Way

Embracing the vibrant spirit of Jamaica doesn’t have to involve alcohol. As we’ve explored the world of non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks, it becomes evident that the Caribbean’s flavors, aromas, and cultural richness can be experienced and enjoyed in a non-alcoholic way. From the pulsating beats of reggae music to the thrill of watching sprinters cross the finish line, Jamaica has captivated the world with its unique offerings.

By indulging in the 11 popular non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks we’ve discussed, you can embark on a sensory journey to this enchanting island’s sun-soaked beaches and lush landscapes.

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Non-Alcoholic Jamaican Drinks FAQs

What is the most popular non-alcoholic Jamaican drink?

One of the most popular non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks is Blue Mountain Coffee. It has a reputation for being one of the world’s best and most expensive coffee brands.

Blue Mountain Coffee is grown in the Blue Mountains, Jamaica’s longest mountain range and one of the Caribbean’s highest peaks at 7,402 feet (2,256 meters). The altitude is claimed to contribute to the richness of this coffee.

What are some traditional non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks?

Whether you’re seeking a thirst quencher on a hot summer day or exploring the rich culinary heritage of Jamaica, these 11 popular non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks are a must-try for anyone looking to savor the flavors of the Caribbean.

1. Blue Mountain Coffee
2. Coconut Water
3. Jamaican Ginger Beer
4. Malta
5. Jamaican Peanut Punch
6. Ting
7. Soursop Juice
8. Bag Juice
9. Sorrel Tea
10. Bush Tea
11. Irish Moss

What is a Jamaica soft drink?

Ting is one of Jamaica’s most popular soft beverages. This is a flexible mixed drink that was founded in 1976. Its secret to popularity is its bittersweet Jamaican grapefruit juice, which gives the drink an addicting and refreshing feel. 

Ting is a common sight in Jamaica and other Caribbean countries. Consider it the region’s Coca-Cola, or, more specifically, a more diverse Coca-Cola.

What are some healthy Jamaican drinks?

As a tropical country, Jamaica has an abundance of tasty, vitamin-packed fruits that will make your mouth wet. As delicious as they come, they are also healthy and refreshing for the body and mind. They are juices and teas.

Some healthy non-alcoholic Jamaican drinks that you can get are soursop juice, sorrel tea, bush tea, and Irish moss.